Recap: Kraftwerk at MoMA

Tickets for Kraftwerk’s eight-night retrospective sold out almost as soon as they were announced. Why wouldn’t they? Eight nights, eight albums, one a night: a chronological showcase of their entire electronic period. I knew about it, but entertained no dreams of attending. I wasn’t fast enough; besides, I was broke. But a friend won a pair of tickets to last night’s show; when he offered me one, I couldn’t refuse. That would be beyond rude. It would be insane.

We arrived early at the Marron Atrium of the Museum of Modern Art, normally home to travelling exhibits. Each concertgoer received a seven-inch by seven-inch program providing a brief biography of Kraftwerk and explaining their influence. (Suffice it to say that contemporary music owes them a lot.) My companion and I also each got a pair of 3-D glasses in a sleeve specific to that night’s performance: 1977’s Trans-Europe Express. As crowds filtered in, we surveyed the merchandise table, where one could buy limited CD box sets and coffee table books on the group’s history. Around me I heard the clipped sounds of German from both event staff (the residency is sponsored by Volkswagen) and from guests. It felt … comforting. This was the right place to see them.

At precisely 8:30 PM, the lights dimmed as a series of booms emanated from the speakers. Black and white pixilated figures danced on the screen hung before the stage. I slipped the 3-D glasses over my own and shut up. Suddenly, a Vocoder-distorted voice spilt the air: a railroad station departure announcement. The curtain dropped. Kraftwerk launched into “Trans-Europe Express.” The crowd erupted into cheers.

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BASS!MINT interview: Shigeto

This Friday, our friends down in New Paltz are bringing Shigeto of Ghostly International to Cabaloosa’s, alongside resident DJs Far East and Jack Inslee, as hosted by MC DRHU of Broken Teeth NYC. Shigeto will be playing a live set, complete with drums, synthesizer and sampler, as sequencing and looping on the fly. Much respect to the Ghostly label and I highly suggest peeking around their site, (you’ll even find once-upon-a-time local band Phantogram on there) and Shigeto is definitely one of the label’s standout artists in my book. Peep the event details here and check the full Q+A beneath the cut!


photo courtesy of ghostly

Given your background in classical jazz / drumming how was the transition process to working with electronic music? What was your introduction to electronic music, production, ghostly, etc? The transition was easy at first. It was all so new and exciting. When you have new things to work with, it’s easy to stay inspired.

I started listening to electronic music as a kid. Early Warp and Ghostly releases were my first inspiration, along with all the 90’s hip hop.

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